Beth Russell

Dr. Russell is the program coordinator for the Certificate in Family Life Education (CFLE), offered through the National Council on Family Relations, and mentors MA and PhD students through the following specializations offered in our graduate program:

She is currently accepting graduate students for the 2017-2018 academic year. Click here to view my current projects.

Educational Background:

2005: Doctor of Philosophy in Human Development and Family Studies; Area of Specialization – Child & Adolescent Development, University of Connecticut

1998: Bachelor of Arts; Dual Concentrations – Medical Sciences, & Comparative Literature, Hampshire College

Research Interests: The ontogeny of self-regulation in normative and at-risk samples

I believe the development of self-regulation begins as other-regulation in infancy, moves through mutual or co-regulation in childhood and becomes increasingly self-regulation in adolescence until young adults partner and/or become parents, thereby moving back into close relationships that require more mutual regulation. My work includes the study of:

  •  parent-child mutual or co-regulation where child outcomes are heavily scaffolded by the caregiver
  •  self-regulation in youth where maturity demands for individuation from caregivers lead self-regulation to the forefront
  •  self-regulation during the transition to parenthood, where individuals enter back into parent-child dyadic exchanges driven by the parents’ regulatory skill.

Challenges to skillful regulation can be encountered in each of these phases so I often address these individual and contextual factors as well. Current topics guiding several of my studies include

  • substance use and recovery in adolescence
  • parenting a child with a chronic health condition
  • parenting in the context of poverty
  • adolescent parenting

Dr. Russell's CV

Selected Recent Publications:

Russell, B. S., Maksut, J., Lincoln, C. R., & Leland, A. J. (2016). Computer-mediated parenting education: Digital family service provision. Children and Youth Services Review, DOI:10.1016/j.childyouth.2016.01.012

Baumbauer, K. M., Young, E. E., Starkweather, A. R., Guite, J. W., Russell, B. S., & Manworren, R. C. (2015). Managing chronic pain in special populations with emphasis on pediatric, geriatric, and drug abuser populations. Medical Clinics of North America, 100 (1), 183-197. DOI:10.1016/j.mcna.2015.08.013

Russell, B. S., Leland, A. J., & Trudeau, J. J. (2015). Social influence on adolescent polysubstance use: The escalation to opioid use. Substance Use & Misuse, 50(10), 1325-1331, DOI: 10.3109/10826084.2015.1013128

Russell, B.S., & Lincoln, C. K. (2015). Distress tolerance and emotion regulation: Promoting maternal mental health across the transition to parenthood. Parenting: Science & Practice, 16 (1), 22-35. DOI:10.1080/15295192.2016.1116893

Russell, B. S. (2014). Adolescent maternal lifecourse outcomes: Implications from an integrated mental health services approach. Journal of Human Sciences and Extension, 2 (2), 65-83.

Mittal, R., Russell, B. S., Britner, P. A., & Peake, P. K. (2013). Delay of gratification in two- and three-year-olds: Associations with attachment, personality, and temperament. Journal of Child and Family Studies, 22(4), 479-489. DOI 10.1007/s10826-012-9600-6.

Russell, B. S., Londhe, R., & Britner, P. A. (2013). Parenting contributions to the delay of gratification in young preschool-aged children. Journal of Child and Family Studies, 22 (4), 471-478. DOI 10.1007/s10826-012-9599-8.

Selected Presentations:

Donohue, E., & Russell, B. S. (2015, March). Negativity stays behind my mask: Maternal strategies for scaffolding preschoolers’ emotion regulation. Poster presented to the biannual meetings of the Society for Research in Child Development, Philadelphia, PA

Donohue, E. B., Simpson, E., & Russell, B. S. (2015, October). When it runs in the family: The role of gender in adolescent perceptions of parental pressure to attend a recovery high school. Poster presented to the biennial meetings of the Society for the Study of Human Development, Austin, TX

Heller, A., Hutchison, M., Romano, K., & Russell, B.S. (2015, March). The power of home: Guardianship effects for adolescents in school-based substance use recovery. Poster presented to the biannual meetings of the Society for Research in Child Development, Philadelphia, PA.

Lincoln, C. R., Leland, A. J., Russell, B. S., & Thompson, A. (2013, March). Adolescent emotion regulation and social influence: Addiction recovery frameworks. Poster presented to the biannual meeting of the Society for Research on Child Development (Seattle, WA).

Leland, A. J., Russell, B. S., Jessee, V. (2015, March). Maternal strategies for promoting preschoolers' self-regulation: Tantrums and self-control. Poster presented to the biannual meetings of the Society for Research in Child Development, Philadelphia, PA.

Martini-Carvell, K., & Russell, B. S. (2014, June). Building a community service safety net for families at risk for early childhood mental health challenges: Mid-Level Developmental Assessment (MLDA). Paper presented to the World Alliance for Infant Mental Health, Edinburgh, UK.

Russell, B. S., Lincoln, C. R., & Leland, A. J. (2014, November). Parenting antecedents of young children’s emotion regulation. Paper presented to the annual meetings of the National Council on Family Relations, Baltimore, MD.

Russell, B. S. & Martini-Carvell, K. (2014, June). Differential longitudinal mental health outcomes for adolescent mothers: Randomized comparison of service delivery models. Paper presented to the World Alliance for Infant Mental Health, Edinburgh, UK.

Russell, B. S. (2014, March). The role of sociocontextual factors on emotion regulation and executive function for youth in substance use recovery. In B. S. Russell (Chair) Substance Use & Interventions symposium, presented to the Society for Research in Adolescence, Austin, TX.

Russell, B.S. (2015, March). Do parents practice what they teach? Maternal socialization of emotion regulation from birth through the preschool years. Paper presented to the biannual meetings of the Society for Research in Child Development, Philadelphia PA